Three exercise myths

Aug 11

For every fitness truth, there’s a myth.

With so much jargon and waffle existing in the fitness industry today, it can be difficult to determine which advice is factual, and which is purely fiction. At RISE by Studio PP, we’re lucky to work amongst a team of some of Australia’s most expert and qualified trainers, dedicated to educating 101 Collins’ customers about the most effective and efficient ways to better their health and wellbeing.

We asked Steph Prem, Founder and Director of RISE by Studio PP, to debunk some of the most common fitness myths.

No pain, no gain.

When it comes to exercise, one of the most vital things that people fail (or refuse) to understand is that everybody is different.

Exercising for general health needs to invigorate, not exhaust.

While there are certainly benefits of intense exercise, what you do on a daily basis must be carefully considered to ensure you don’t fatigue and inevitably burn out. A mix of moderate and vigorous intensity exercise each week is much more beneficial than constant, maximal efforts. If you are inactive, starting out with a daily 30-minute brisk walk can deliver significant health benefits.

Ask yourself: Are you over training? If you undertake 6-7 HIIT workouts per week, try choosing movements that will benefit your nervous system, such as Pilates or Yoga. This will complement the high intensity workouts, allowing you to burn your fat stores more effectively.

Crunch your way to abs.

I’m sure we have all heard the expression – “abs are made in the kitchen, not in the gym”. I’m sorry to say, it’s true! Sit ups, crunches and Pilates are all great for building core stability and toning your abdominal wall, but only if you have a good diet in place.

Ultimately, we need to lower our overall body fat in order to see a difference around our abdominals and reveal the hard work of all those years of crunching. Try introducing more gut-happy and low inflammatory ingredients and recipes into your diet to really make a difference.

Exercise counteracts desk time.

Wrong. Sedentary behavior in our modern society is causing serious health implications, with Aussies reportedly remaining sedentary for 7-10 hours each day (outside of sleeping). Unfortunately, no gym session or vigorous exercise can compensate these extended amounts of time spent sitting. Sedentary behavior is an independent risk factor for chronic disease, meaning we must spend less time sitting at our desks and in our cars, in addition to exercise.

Even if you are working out 5 times a week, minimizing (and especially, breaking up) sedentary time is required to reduce your overall health risk. My advice? Take the stairs, walk to your boss’s office instead of emailing them, take a lap of the block in your coffee break – mix it up as much as you can.

To chat to Steph about common exercise myths and how RISE can tailor the best workout for you, get in touch with out Wellness Manager, Carmen, at rise@101collins.com.au.

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